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  • Systematic Analysis of Transparency in the Gait Rehabilitation Device the FLOAT

    Increasing the transparency of robotic systems used for gait rehabilitation can improve training of various daily activities such as walking or balancing. However, until today, there has been very little effort invested in a systematic analysis of occurring unwanted interaction forces between the patient and the robot.

  • Arm Studio Flyer

    We offer a comprehensive set of arm and hand therapy devices designed to intensify treatment of severely to moderately affected patients after stroke. In line with a distal bilateral approach, the equipment comprises machines for highest possible stimulation intensity for hand and arm training and can be complemented by a finger training device Reha Digit.

  • Bi-Manu-Trainer Flyer

    The Bi-Manu-Trainer supports patients with sensory-motor and cognitive impairment during rehabilitation. It provides uni- and bi-manual training exercises with focus on visuomotor finger, hand and arm coordination using sophisticated sensor technology and virtual reality.

  • FLOAT Compact Flyer

    The FLOAT compact is a dynamic overground body weight support system supporting stroke or SCI impaired patients in the training and rehabilitation of their natural motion. The single track system offers a space saving solution at affordable cost, yet still ensuring easy-to-operate and safe training programs with a maximum natural posture and gait kinematics.

  • Effect of a Therapeutic Intervention for the Hemiplegic Upper Limb in the Acute Phase after Stroke

    Adding a specific intervention during the acute phase after stroke improved motor recovery, which was apparent 1 year later. These results emphasize the potential beneficial effect of therapeutic interventions for the arm.

  • Electromechanical-assisted training for walking after stroke: a major update of the evidence

    People who receive electromechanical-assisted gait training in combination with physiotherapy after stroke are more likely to achieve independent walking than people who receive gait training without these devices. We concluded that seven patients need to be treated to prevent one dependency in walking. Specifically, people in the first three months after stroke and those who are not able to walk seem to benefit most from this type of intervention. The role of the type of device is still not clear. Further research should consist of large definitive pragmatic phase III trials undertaken to address specific questions about the most effective frequency and duration of electromechanical-assisted gait training as well as how long any benefit may last.

  • Electromechanical-Assisted Training for Walking after Stroke (Review)

    People who receive electromechanical-assisted gait training in combination with physiotherapy after stroke are more likely to achieve independent walking than people who receive gait training without these devices. We concluded that seven patients need to be treated to prevent one dependency in walking. Specifically, people in the first three months after stroke and those who are not able to walk seem to benefit most from this type of intervention. The role of the type of device is still not clear. Further research should consist of large definitive pragmatic phase III trials undertaken to address specific questions about the most effective frequency and duration of electromechanical-assisted gait training as well as how long any benefit may last.

  • A systematic review of bilateral upper limb training devices for post-stroke rehabilitation

    Initial clinical results are not yet of such caliber that the devices in question and the concepts on which they are based are firmly established. However, the clinical outcomes do not rule out the possibility that the concept of bilateral training and the accompanied devices may provide a useful extension of currently available forms of therapy. To actually demonstrate their (surplus) value, more research with adequate experimental, dose-matched designs, and sufficient statistical power are required.

  • Robot assisted arm trainer for the passive and active practice of bilateral forearm and wrist movements in hemiparetic subjects

    The arm trainer made possible intensive bilateral elbow and wrist training of severely affected stroke patients. Future studies should address the treatment effect in subacute stroke patients and determine the optimum treatment intensity.